Composer Motohiro Kawashima made a name for himself collaborating with Yuzo Koshiro on the experimental and highly influential soundtrack to Streets of Rage 3 for Sega Genesis. For his return to the series as one of the contributors to Streets of Rage 4, he shared the following thoughts in his liner notes for the game’s vinyl release, which are reprinted here. Provided courtesy of Alex Aniel/Brave Wave Productions.

It’s been over 20 years since Streets of Rage 3, and since then I had never even dreamed that Streets of Rage 4 would finally be released. I’ve received comments from Streets of Rage fans over the years that have helped shape who I am today. I am truly grateful to have been involved in the long-awaited sequel.

When I was first approached for Streets of Rage 4, I was worried about how to compose the music given how much time had passed since the previous release. I made 4 tracks in Streets of Rage 2 and 10 in Streets of Rage 3. I tried to recall how I approached those games back in the day. I already dabbled in many different genres of music, but I was heavily influenced by underground artists and thought it would be interesting to see that specific flavor of sound replicated in a game.

In the ’90s, I was particularly influenced by Rotterdam Records, jungle music (which was called drum ’n bass back then), Underground Resistance, The Shamen, LFO, Andrew Weatherall, German trance, German techno, and so on.

Also, I used to go clubbing and disco with Yuzo Koshiro, and we would have discussions about good music and introduce new beats to each other for our own encouragement.

Making music for the Genesis/Mega Drive back then was not like making music on a DAW (digital audio workstation) today. Making even one track required a lot of effort. There were limitations to the types of sound sources we could use, the inflexibility with the programming (I remember how tough it was to migrate over from desktop music), the number of tracks we could use, and so forth.

That said, when getting accustomed to this environment, I came to appreciate the charms of the Genesis/Mega Drive’s sound, which have a sense of profoundness to it. I could feel the bass in my stomach (Yuzo Koshiro felt the same way back then). There was a sense of roughness to the sound that I couldn’t imagine getting out of a DAW environment. The sound is gentle, overflowing with a sense of intricacy and sexiness. Working with the Genesis/Mega Drive had its technical limitations, but I felt that amidst these limitations lay unlimited possibilities.

After I finished working on Streets of Rage 3, I remember wanting to create Streets of Rage 4 right away. It felt just like yesterday when I had those feelings. Over 20 years later, now being given the opportunity to do so, I honestly felt a sense of confusion, as well. 

Given how the development of Streets of Rage 4 was different from that of the original trilogy, I was worried about whether I was a fit for the project, but once I got started, it turned out to be a rather smooth process. I was able to visualize in my head what the Streets of Rage world was like and create music as I saw fit.

I’d like to explain my production process for bringing the world of Streets of Rage 4 to life through my music. The world is an accumulation of wicked phrases that are three-dimensional. The phrases and rhythms are intoxicating and repeat themselves. They sometimes have no consistent tonality, and other times chromatic semitones. These rhythms are the ones that punch you in the gut. The way they play out will surprise and dazzle you from time to time. They’re sexual (laughs) and intellectual (or solid?), and other times they’re metallic and mechanical. Pop, funk, jazz, rock, techno, and experimental. It’s a world where the power of music binds these different elements together. And of course, it is timeless, universal and a subculture of utter maniacs.

That’s that I had in mind for the world of Streets of Rage when composing for the fourth entry. Of course, you can listen to the tracks and figure out for yourself what this all means to you.

I am excited to see what this new ensemble of musicians have brought to the Streets of Rage series. I look forward to playing this new Streets of Rage game, as I heartily celebrate its gameplay and music. 

ベアナックル4

ライナーノート:

ベアナックル3(Streets of Rage 3)から20年以上もたって、まさかベアナックル4(Streets of Rage 4)が発売されるなんて夢にも思いませんでした。

その間多くのベアナックルファンから語り継がれ、大事に育てられてきたように思います。

今回この奇跡のプロジェクトに参加できたことを本当に感謝致します!

やはりこれだけの年月が経っていることから、最初制作の依頼を受けたとき、どのような音楽がベストなのか考えることに頭を悩ませました。

僕はベアナックル24曲、ベアナックル310曲参加しました。当時どのように曲を作っていたのか。。

とにかく数多くの音楽に触れ、当時特にアンダーグラウンドと呼ばれたアルバムやアーティストに強く影響を受けていたので、そういうサウンドの質感をゲームで鳴らせたらどんなに面白い事かという一心で思いっきり作りたい曲を作ってました。

当時の影響を受けた音楽はロッテルダムレコード(レーベル名)、ジャングル(ドラムンベースの当時の呼び方)、アンダーグラウンドレジスタンス、シェイメン、LFO、アンドリューウェザウォール、ジャーマントランス、ジャーマンテクノなどなど。。

そして、古代さんとは当時のディスコやクラブによく一緒に遊びに出かけ、お互いにいいと思う曲を語り合ったり、紹介し合ったりしたことが何よりも励みになったことだと思います。

当時のメガドライブの制作環境は今のようなDAWベースで作るわけではなくかなり制限の中で曲を作らねばなりませんでした。

音源の制約からプログラミングの不自由さ(僕は特にDTMからの移行だったので覚えるのが大変でした)、トラック数も制限されてました。

と言いつつも、慣れるにしたがって、曲を作るたびに感じたのはメガドライブでの音源としての魅力です。

音の質感が極めて重厚感があり、お腹に響く低音があり(これは当時古代さんとも意見がとても合いました)DAWシステムでは考えられないような出音の質感の荒々しさがありました。

同時に繊細なところは艶めかしくも柔らかい音になります。

そして確かにこのプロセスは制限だらけだけれども、制限の中にも無限の音楽作りの可能性を感じたものです。

当時、ベアナックル3の音楽制作を終えた直後、すぐにでもベアナックル4を作りたかった!という記憶は昨日の事のように鮮明に憶えてます。

そしてまさか20年以上経ってそのチャンスが巡ってくるとは!。。いささか戸惑いもありました。

このベアナックル4を当時とは全く違う環境で作るとういうことが果たしてできるのだろうかという不安もありましたが、やってみたら意外にスムーズに作る事ができました。

基本ベアナックルの世界観をイメージして自分が作りたい音楽を素直に作る。

参考までにベアナックル4の制作にあたって僕の頭に描いたベアナックルの音楽の世界観を言葉にしてみましょう!

「それは邪悪なフレーズの集合体であり、それらが立体的であること。

陶酔感のあるフレーズやリズムの繰り返しがあり、フレーズは時に無調性、あるいは半音階的。

基本、お腹にくるパンチのあるリズムであり、

途中で時にはびっくりするような仕掛けや構成上の展開あり、

セクシー(?笑)で理知的、理性的(もしくはソリッド?)、時にはメタリックあるいは機械的な世界観であり、

パンク、ファンク、ジャズ、ロック、テクノ、ときには実験的に。あらゆる音楽的な力を合わせ持ったものであり。

そして時代を超えて普遍性を得た極めてマニアックなサブカル的音楽。」

あくまで僕が制作にあたって意識したことです。

もちろん聴き方は自由です。

今回著名な素晴らしい作曲家の方達の新しい解釈によるベアナックルサウンドもとても楽しみです!

この新しくなったベアナックルを僕はまずは遊んでゲームと音楽を楽しませてもらってその復活を心から祝福して楽しみたいと思います!

川島基宏

July 15, 2020